Windsor Star Drug Shortages

Posted June 17th in The Windsor Star‘s healthcare section:

Kaye Brown says she constantly fights fatigue because she hasn’t had her prescribed injections of iron or vitamin B12 since January.

She’s not the only one having trouble getting medicine. A rotating drug shortage has become routine in Ontario, meaning hospitals, pharmacies and patients often scramble when certain medications go through bouts of short supply.

“I feel frustrated,” said Brown, who lives in a long-term care home in Windsor. “I feel like the present government doesn’t care about us seniors in homes or out in the community. We’re not important enough.”

Brown has been told that the drugs she needs are on back order, so she has been taking B12 in pill form everyday — which she says is not as effective or as convenient as a once-a-month shot.

“The injection would give me more strength and I would be able to do more things,” said the 61-year-old widower who has fibromyalgia and arthritis and uses a wheelchair. “I don’t have enough energy to do what I would like to do. I could fall asleep just after breakfast.”

read the article at The Windsor Star

I used to take vitamin B12 injectables years ago in collage and all in all never noticed a tremendous benefit. The last few years I noticed that my energy levels were increasingly lower. For the longest time I knocked it down to stress and aging as my routine blood work didn’t show anything untoward. 

When I was quite young I was borderline anemic (iron deficient) for awhile but since beginning a rigorous exercise protocol and changing my diet which has endured to this day the problem disappeared. I quit taking multi vitamins a number of years ago as they seemed to impeding my digestive process and causing some stress to my gastro intestinal tract. My sense is that this has to do with some of the binders they use in multi vitamins as I did feel better once I stopped taking them.

Out of curiosity I decided to give injectable B12 another shot (pardon the pun) as the injections go right into the bloodstream when I came across the online marketer vitaminb12direct.com. I didn’t really expect miracles but I have definitely noticed a boost in my overall sense of well being. My athletic performance has picked up as well and I think this has to do with the b12 having a positive effect on my appetite. I seem to have a better nitrogen balance in my body and I get a much better pump when I lift weights. I swear its increased my testosterone as well but this could be a spin off of the increased metabolic health which would naturally lead to a more balanced endocrine system. Whatever the case I’m staying with my current subcutaneous injection protocol of .5 cc 2000 MCG every second day for the next while. BTW, the service you guys offer on the site is great!

Sebastian in Culver City CA

 

It’s a little known fact that vitamin B12 can be administered painlessly and with effect in individuals with a body fat index under 25 by subcutaneous injection using a standard 1CC 29 Gauge Insulin Syringe. Please note that individuals who have a high body fat index (over 25, 30 being clinically obese, may compromise absorption and run the risk of causing inflammation in the fatty tissue) should not opt for this method of administration and should instead stick with the standard intramuscular protocol.

The safe injection protocol for this method of administration is exactly the same as with intramuscular injections except that instead of injecting straight into the muscle you pinch a fold of skin between the thumb and forefinger and inject directly into the fold at a horizontal angle. It is very likely that unlike the standard intramuscular injection you may save yourself a sore (deltoid) shoulder muscle, or quadriceps (large front muscle of the leg).

For the daily user of vitamin B12 painless injections with a fine 29 Gauge syringe may be more practicable than a 23-24 Gauge intramuscular “harpoon”. After all, this is about feeling great so why make yourself a human pin cushion if you don’t have to. If you’ve tried this method of administration we’d like to hear your comments and opinions….

Please note that this posting reflects the personal opinions of the writer only and that any information contained herein is not medical advice. All decisions regarding the taking and administration of injectable substances should be done in consultation with one’s physician.

Detailed information between (SC) and (IM) injection protocols

More information on BMI (body fat index), obesity and risks to health

Vitamin B12 Shortages CTV News

CTV feature news report on Canadian vitamin B12 shortage and the effect it is having on those who need it.

The problem is that there are shortages of the vitamin across Canada. Levesque hasn’t had a B12 injection in close to two months and says she’s feeling the side effects.

“I’m more tired, more anxious. And I work with kids, so of course I need all my energy,” she tells CTV Atlantic.

It’s estimated that as many as five per cent of Canadian adults have a vitamin B12 deficiency. The most common cause is pernicious anemia, a condition in which people lack a key stomach protein that allows them to absorb the vitamin from food.

 

Read the news story at CTV news and watch the feature