Vitamin B12 direct to you. Save money and feel great!

B12 Deficiency and Gluten Sensitivity

Connection Between B12 Deficiency and Gluten Sensitivity?

B12 Deficiency and gluten sensitivity (GS) are generally considered to be unrelated, except in cases of diagnosed celiac disease (CD). Taking a look at new findings on GS and connecting the dots challenges this assumption. Examining the issue in depth leads us to consider the possibility that vitamin b12 deficiency may be a factor for some GS sufferers as well.

Vitamin B12: Diet, Age and Supplementation

An ongoing 18 year long study challenges several commonly accepted truths about B12 deficiency. If you are young and eat meat you likely believe you have a reduced risk of deficiency – maybe not…

Study Found 39% at Risk of B12 Deficiency

Most of us believe if we follow a diet heavy in animal products including meat, eggs or dairy, we should have enough vitamin B12 in our bodies. Researchers at Tuft’s University suggest that this may not be the case. They cite the Framingham Offspring Study which found 39% of subjects were at risk of becoming vitamin B12 deficient.(1)  An important detail is the cross generational nature of this study: 26-49, 50-64 and 65-83.

Framingham Offspring directly contradicts the commonly held view being passed down to dinner tables over the generations: that heavy meat eaters are less likely to be clinically deficient than the rest of the population. In fact, participants who had the best vitamin B12 levels were those that ate fortified cereals. 

Vitamin Absorption and Resulting Deficiencies are not Necessarily Symptoms of Ageing

Remember when we noted that the Framingham Offspring was cross generational? The study participants most at risk of vitamin B12 deficiency provide insights on the relevance of age to vitamin absorption. Surprisingly, vitamin B12 deficiency is to date no more common among the older portion of the sample. Moreover, this finding challenges the widespread belief that absorption and resulting deficiencies are necessarily a symptom of ageing.

Vitamin B12 Injections for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is estimated to affect as much as 3% of the population.  A simple treatment of vitamin B12 injections along with folic acid supplements, even if it only helps a portion of those affected, would relieve much distress.

CFS, also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), is a little understood illness. It is diagnosed based on patients reports of symptoms – tiredness without cause or relief, headaches, muscle and joint pain, memory loss, loss of concentration. Many possible causes have been proposed, but the true mechanism of this illness is not understood.

B12 Deficiency Increases With Age: Paris Study

An interesting study conducted in Paris hospitals with 14k participants aged 50-90 years.  Vitamin B12 deficiency is found to increase with age –  “functional B12 deficiency was 9.6% in patients aged 30-60 years and 14.2% in patients over 90 years”.

BACKGROUND: Cobalamin deficiency is responsible for hematological, neurological, neurocognitive, and neuropsychiatric impairments and is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, particularly in the elderly people.

METHODS: In order to determine B12 status in old inpatients, a total number of 14,904 hospitalized patients in whom B12 measurements were performed in five hospitals in the Paris metropolitan area were included from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011. The aims of the study were to determine whether age had an impact on B12 and folate deficiencies and to evaluate correlations between B12 and biological parameters-folate, hemoglobin, mean cell volume, homocystein (tHcy)-and age.

RESULTS: Patients were aged 70.3±19.5 years. Low B12 concentration (<200ng/L) was observed in 4.6% of cases, 24.2% had middle B12 concentration (200-350ng/L), 12.6% were functional B12 deficient (B12 < 350 ng/L associated to high tHcy level, tHcy > 17 µmol/L), 20.4% had low folate concentration (folate < 4 µg/L), 10.6% were functional folate deficient (folate < 4 µg/L associated to tHcy > 17 µmol/L), and 4.7% of patients were both functional B12 and folate deficient. …  Frequency of functional B12 deficiency was 9.6% in patients aged 30-60 years and 14.2% in patients over 90 years. Frequency of functional folate deficiency was 9.5% in 30-60 years and 12.1% in >90 years.

CONCLUSIONS: In inpatients, functional B12 deficiency and functional folate deficiency increase with age and are not associated with anemia or macrocytosis. False vitamin B deficiencies are frequent.

The last statement of the conclusion is puzzling – wonder if it is central to the study or an interesting aside.  Would appreciate any input on that point.

B12 Deficiency Increases With Age in Hospitalized Patients: A Study on 14,904 Samples.
Mézière A et al, Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America

Shopping cart close